Monday, January 9, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - Creating Positive Change : Part 2

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The first order of things to be changed is me, the leader. After I consider how hard it is to change myself, then I will understand the challenge of trying to change others. This is the ultimate test of leadership.



Last time, we talked about the Leader as a Change Agent. Today, we will discuss the various forms of resistance the change agent may encounter.



Why People Resist Change:
  • The change isn't self-initiated.
    -When people lack ownership of an idea, they usually resist it, even when it is in their best interest.
    - Wise leaders allow followers to give input and be a part of the process of change.

  • Routine is disrupted.
    - Habits allow us to do things without much thought, which is why most of us have so many of them.
    - Habits are not instincts. They are acquired reactions. They don't just happen; they are caused.
    - First we form habits, but then our habits form us.

  • Change creates fear of the unknown.
    - Change means traveling in uncharted waters, and this causes our insecurities to rise.
    - Therefore, many people are more comfortable with old problems than with new solutions.

  • The purpose of change is unclear.
    - That's why decisions should be made at the lowest level possible. The decision-maker, because of close proximity to the issue, will make a better decision, and those most affected by the decision will know it quickly by hearing it from a source close to them and to the problem.

  • Change creates fear of failure.
    - Elbert Hubbard said that the greatest mistake a person can make is to be afraid of making one.

  • The rewards for change don't match the effort change requires.
    - What leaders sometimes fail to recognize is that the followers will always weigh the advantage/disadvantage issue in light of personal gain/loss, not organization gain/loss.

  • People are too satisfied with the way things are.
    - We choose to die rather than choose to change.

  • Change won't happen when people engage in negative thinking.
    - Regardless of his state in the present, the negative thinker finds disappointment in the future.

  • The followers lack respect for the leader.
    - People will view the change according to the way they view the change-agent.
    - When you love your followers genuinely and correctly, they'll respect you and follow you through many changes.

  • The leader is susceptible to feelings of personal criticism.
    - For growth and continual effectiveness, every organization must go through a continuous four-stage cycle of create, conserve, criticize, and change.
    - Either the creators handle criticism positively and begin to make changes or they will be replaced by those who will embrace change and, therefore, create.

  • Change may mean personal loss.
    - "How will this affect me?"
    - Usually there are three groups of people within the organization:
            1. Those who will lose,
            2. Those who are neutral, and
            3. Those who will benefit.
    - Each group is different and must be handled with sensitivity, but also with straightforwardness.

  • Change requires additional commitment.
    - Time is the most precious commodity for many people.
    - Whenever change is about to happen, we all look to see how it will affect our time.

  • Narrow-mindedness thwarts acceptance of new ideas.

  • Tradition resists change. 


Next time, we will discover how to create a climate for change.


Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - Creating Positive Change : Part 1

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The first order of things to be changed is me, the leader. After I consider how hard it is to change myself, then I will understand the challenge of trying to change others. This is the ultimate test of leadership.

Change the leader, change the organization. Everything rises and falls on leadership.


Unchanged leaders equals unchanged organizations. People do what people see.

"There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things."  Nicolo Machiavelli

"You see, effective teaching comes only through a change person. The more you change, the more you become an instrument of change in the lives of others. If you want to become a change agent, you also must change." Howard Hendricks


The Leader As Change Agent
  • Once the leader has personally changed and discerned the difference between novel change and needed change, then that leader must become a change agent.

      • He must first understand the two important requisites to bringing about change: knowing the technical requirements of the change, and understanding the attitude and motivational demands for bringing it about.

          • Both requisites are critically necessary. More often than not, though, when failure to change results, it is because of inadequate or inappropriate motivation, not from lack of technical smarts.

              • A manager usually will be more skilled in the technical requirements of change, whereas the leader will have a better understanding of the attitudinal and motivational demands that the followers need. Note the difference in the beginning the skills of a leader are essential. No change will ever occur if the psychological needs are unmet. Once the change has begun, the skills of a manager are needed to maintain needed change.

              Next time, we will learn why people resist change.
              Donald G Rosenbarger
              Senior Vice President
              Delta Companies Inc

              Monday, November 14, 2016

              Developing the Leader Within You - Priorities : Part 3

              We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

              There are two things that are most difficult to get people to do: to think and to do things in order of importance.

              Maxwell lays out eight Priority Principles to close this chapter.

              1. Priorities Never "Stay Put."
                • Priorities continually shift and demand attention.
                • Well-placed priorities always sit on "the edge."
                • To keep priorities in place:
                  • Evaluate: Every month review the 3R/s (Requirements/Return/Reward)
                  • Eliminate: Ask yourself, "What am I doing that can be done by someone else?"
                  • Estimate: What are the top projects I am doing this month and how long will they take?
                • You Cannot Overestimate the Unimportance of Practically Everything.
                  • "The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook." - William James
                • The Good is the Enemy of the Best.
                  • Most people can prioritize when faced with a right or wrong issue. The challenge comes when we are faced with two good choices.
                  • How to Break the Tie Between Two Good Options:
                    • Ask your overseer or coworkers their preference.
                    • Can one of the options be handled by someone else? If so, pass it on and work on the one only you can handle.
                    • Which option would be of more benefit to the customer?
                    • Make your decision based on the purpose of the organization.
                • You Can't Have It All.
                  • Ninety-five percent of achieving is knowing what you want.
                • Too Many Priorities Paralyze Us.
                  • If you are overloaded with work, list the priorities on a separate sheet of paper before you take it to your boss and see what she will choose as the priorities.
                  • All true leaders have learned to say 'NO' to the good in order to say 'YES' to the best.
                • When Little Priorities Demand Too Much of Us, Big Problems Arise.
                  • "The reason most major goals are not achieved is that we spend our time doing second things first." - Robert J. McKain
                  • Often the little things in life us up.
                • Time Deadlines and Emergencies Force Us to Prioritize.
                  • We find this in Parkinson's Law: If you have only one letter to write, it will take you all day. If you have twenty letters to write, you'll get them done in one day.
                  • When is our most efficient time in our work? The week before vacation!
                    • Why can't we always run our lives the way we do the week before we leave the office - making decisions, cleaning off the desk, returning calls?
                    • Under normal conditions, we are efficient (doing things right).
                    • When time pressure mounts or emergencies arise, we become effective (doing the right things).
                  • Efficiency is the foundation for survival.
                  • Effectiveness is the foundation of success.

                • Too Often We Learn Too Late What is Really Important.
                  • "An infant is born with a clenched fist; a man dies with an open hand. Life has a way of prying free the things we think are so important." - Author Unknown
                Donald G Rosenbarger
                Senior Vice President
                Delta Companies Inc

                Wednesday, November 2, 2016

                Developing the Leader Within You - Priorities : Part 2

                We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

                There are two things that are most difficult to get people to do: to think and to do things in order of importance.

                Last time, we leaned about The Pareto Principle, which states 20% of your priorities will give you 80% of your production. Let's see what else Maxwell can tell us about it.

                It's Not How Hard You Work; It's How Smart You Work. Working hard only helps if you are working hard on your priorities.


                Organize or Agonize. The ability to juggle three or four high priority projects successfully is a must for every leader. A life in which anything goes will ultimately be a life in which nothing goes.

                Prioritize Assignments:

                • High Importance/High Urgency: Tackle these projects first.
                  • High Importance/Low Urgency: Set deadlines for completion and get these projects worked into your daily routine.
                    • Low Importance/High Urgency: Find quick, efficient ways to get this work done without much personal involvement. If possible, delegate it to a "can do" assistant.
                      • Low Importance/Low Urgency: This is busy or repetitious work, such as filing. Stack it up and do it in one-half hour segments, every week; get someone else to do it, or don't do it at all.

                        Chose or Lose. Every person is either an initiator or a reactor when it comes to planning. The question is not, "Will my calendar be full?" but "Who will fill my calendar?" If we are leaders of others, the question is not, "Will I see people?" but "Who will I see?" Maxwell's observation is that leaders tend to initiate and followers tend to react.

                        Leaders:
                        • Initiate
                        • Lead; pick up phone and make contact
                        • Spend time planning; anticipate problems
                        • Invest time with people
                        • Fill the calendar by priorities
                        Followers:
                        • React
                        • Listen; wait for phone to ring
                        • Spend time living day-to-day; react to problems
                        • Spend time with people
                        • Fill the calendar by requests

                        Evaluate or Stalemate. Decide what to do and do it; decide what not to do and don't do it. Evaluation of priorities, however, is not quite that simple.

                          • What is required of me?
                            -A leader can give up anything except final responsibility.
                            -Distinguish between what you have to do and what can be delegated to someone else.
                          • What gives me the greatest return?
                            -The effort expended should approximate the results expected.
                            -A question you must continually ask yourself is, "Am I doing what I do best and receiving a good return for the organization?"

                          • What is most rewarding?
                            -Life is too short not to be fun. Our best work takes place when we enjoy it.
                            -Take This Job and Love it.
                            -Success in your work will be greatly increased if the 3 R's (Requirements/Return/Reward) are similar.

                          Next time, we will take a look at the Priority Principles.
                            Donald G Rosenbarger
                            Senior Vice President
                            Delta Companies Inc

                            Wednesday, October 5, 2016

                            Developing the Leader Within You - Priorities : Part 1

                            We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

                            The Key to Leadership: Priorities : Part 1

                            There are two things that are most difficult to get people to do: to think and to do things in order of importance.

                            Success can be defined as the progressive realization of a predetermined goal. This definition tells us that the discipline to prioritize and the ability to work toward a stated goal are essential to a leader's success. In fact, Maxwell believes they are the key to leadership.


                            The Pareto Principle

                            20% of your priorities will give you 80% of your production.
                            IF
                            you spend your time, energy, money, and personnel on the top 20% of your priorities.

                             
                            The solid lines on the 20/80 Principle represent a person or organization that invests time, energy, money, and personnel on the most important priorities. The result is a four-fold return in productivity. The dotted lines represent a person or organization that spends time, energy, money, and personnel on the lesser priorities. The result is a very small return.

                            Every leader needs to understand the Pareto Principle in the area of people oversight and leadership. For example, 20% of the people will be responsible for 80% of the company's success.

                            The following strategy will enable a leader to increase the productivity of an organization.
                            1. Determine which people are the top 20% producers.
                            2. Invest 80% of your "people time" with the top 20%.
                            3. Invest 80% of your personnel development dollars on the top 20%.
                            4. Determine what 20% of the work gives 80% of the return and train an assistant to do the 80% less effective work. This "frees up" the producer to do what he/she does best.
                            5. Ask the top 20% to do on-the-job training for the next 20%.
                            Remember, we teach what we know; we reproduce what we are.

                            Donald G Rosenbarger
                            Senior Vice President
                            Delta Companies Inc



                            Tuesday, October 4, 2016

                            Developing the Leader Within You - Influence : Part 3

                            We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

                            Leadership is influence. That's it. Nothing more. Nothing less.

                            In the introduction of the book, Maxwell states: The key to success in an endeavor is the ability to lead others successfully. And, as we have heard before, Everything rises and falls on leadership.

                            The Five Levels of Leadership

                            Through his years in leadership and the business of leadership, Maxwell has created a model reflecting the various levels of leadership. He has also created a teaching tool to assist others in understanding their levels of leadership so they can increase their levels of influence.

                            The Five Levels of Leadership are:
                            1. Level 1: Position
                            2. Level 2: Permission
                            3. Level 3: Production
                            4. Level 4: People Development
                            5. Level 5: Personhood

                            Maxwell's model indicates that in order to get to the top, you must do two things:

                            • Know what level you are on at this moment.
                              • You will be on different levels with different people, so you need to know which people are on which level.
                            • Know and apply the qualities needed to be successful at each level.
                              • Below is a partial listing of the characteristics that you must exhibit with excellence before you can move to the next level.

                                Level 1: Position / Rights
                              • Know your job description thoroughly.
                              • Be aware of the history of the organization.
                              • Accept responsibility.
                              • Be a team player.
                              • Do your job with consistence excellence.
                              • Do more than expected.

                                Level 2: Permission / Relationship
                              • Make those who work with you more successful.
                              • See through other people's eyes.
                              • Do "win-win" or don't do it.
                              • Include others in your journey.
                              • Deal wisely with difficult people.

                                Level 3: Production / Results
                              • Initiate and accept responsibility for growth.
                              • Develop and follow a statement of purpose.
                              • Develop accountability for results, beginning with yourself.
                              • Know and do the things that give a high return.
                              • Become a change-agent and understand timing.
                              • Make the difficult decisions that will make a difference.

                                Level 4: People Development / Reproduction
                              • Realize that people are your most valuable asset.
                              • Place a priority on developing people.
                              • Be a model for others to follow.
                              • Expose key leaders to growth opportunities.
                              • Be able to attract other winners to the common goal.
                              • Surround yourself with an inner core that complements your leadership.

                                Level 5: Personhood / Respect
                              • Your followers are loyal.
                              • You have invested years mentoring and molding leaders.
                              • Your greatest joy comes from watching others grow and develop.
                              • You transcend the organization.
                            Well, that is certainly a lot to think, absorb and put into action. This is why Mawell says leaders are developed daily, not in a day. Leadership takes time and commitment.

                            Next time, we will explore the key to leadership - priorities.
                            Donald G Rosenbarger
                            Senior Vice President
                            Delta Companies Inc

                            Monday, September 19, 2016

                            Developing the Leader Within You - Influence : Part 2

                            We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

                            Leadership is influence. That's it. Nothing more. Nothing less.

                            The Five Levels of Leadership

                            Through his years in leadership and the business of leadership, Maxwell has created a model reflecting the various levels of leadership. He has also created a teaching tool to assist others in understanding their levels of leadership so they can increase their levels of influence.

                            Level 1: Position

                            We covered this level last time. This is the basic entry level of leadership. The only influence you have is that which comes with a title. People who stay at this level get into territorial rights, protocol, tradition, and organizational charts.

                            We will take a brief look at the next four levels of leadership ....


                            Level 2: Permission

                            Fred Smith says, "Leadership is getting people to work for you when they are not obligated." People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care. Leadership begins with the heart, not the head. It flourishes with a meaningful relationship, not more regulation.

                            On this level, time, energy, and focus are placed on the individual's needs and desires. People who are unable to build solid, lasting relationships will soon discover that they are unable to sustain long, effective leadership.

                            Caution! Don't try to skip a level. The most often skipped level is 2, Permission. Relationships involve a process that provides the glue and much of the staying power for long-term, consistent production.

                            Level 3: Production

                            On this level things begin to happen, good thing. Profit increases. Morale is high. Turnover is low. Needs are being met. Goals are being realized. Accompanying this growth is the "big mo" - momentum. Everyone is results-orientated. In fact, results are the main reason for the activity.

                            This is a major difference between levels 2 and 3. On the "relationship" level, people get together jus to get together. There is no other objective. On the "results" level, people come together to accomplish a purpose.


                            Level 4: People Development

                            How do you spot a leader?

                            There is a clue: Since some people are mediocre, the true leader can be recognized because somehow his people consistently demonstrate superior performances.

                            A leader is great, not because of his or her power, but because of his or her ability to empower others. Success without a successor is failure. A worker's main responsibility is developing others to do the work.

                            Loyalty to the leader reaches its highest peak when the follower has personally grown through the mentorship of the leader.

                            The core of leaders who surround you should all be people you have personally mentored or helped to develop in some way.

                            The following suggestions will help you become a people developer:
                            • Walk slowly through the crowd.
                              • Learn names.
                              • Make yourself available for communication and conversation.
                              • Visit member of your crew during the shift.
                            • Develop key leaders.
                              • Communicate with the influencers within your crew.
                              • They will pass on to the others what you have given them.
                            Level 5: Personhood

                            Very few people will ever achieve this level, so Maxwell chooses not to discuss it just yet. Later, perhaps. Here are some additional insights on climbing the steps of leadership:
                            • The higher you go, the longer it takes.
                            • The higher you go, the higher the level of commitment.
                            • The higher you go, the easier it is to lead.
                            • The higher you go, the greater the growth.
                            • You never leave the base level.
                            • If you are leading a group of people, you will not be on the same level with everyone.
                            • For your leadership to remain effective, it is essential that you take the other influencers within the group with you to the higher levels.
                            Next time, we will review the conclusions of this chapter of the book and the key characteristics of each of The Five Levels of Leadership.

                            Donald G Rosenbarger
                            Senior Vice President
                            Delta Companies Inc