Thursday, August 11, 2016

Developing the Leader Within You - Introduction




Source
We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

In the introduction of the book, Maxwell states: The key to success in an endeavor is the ability to lead others successfully. And, as we have heard before, Everything rises and falls on leadership.

Fortunately, leadership can be taught. Leadership is not an exclusive club for those who were "born with it." The traits that are raw materials of leadership can be acquired. Link them up with the desire and nothing can keep you from becoming a leader. Maxwell's book will supply the leadership principles. Each of us must supply the desire.

There has always been a great deal of confusion over the difference between "leadership" and "management." Management is the process of assuring that the program and objectives of the organization are implemented. Leadership, on the other hand, has to do with casting vision and motivating people.

John C. Gardner, former Secretary of the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, has pinpointed five characteristics that set "leader managers" apart from "run-of-the-mill managers.":
  1. Leader Managers are long-term thinkers who see beyond the day's crisis and the quarterly report.
  2. Leader Managers' interests in their companies do not stop with the units they head. They want to know how all the company's departments affect one another, and they are constantly reaching beyond their specific areas of influence.
  3. Leader Managers put heavy emphasis on vision, values, and motivation.
  4. Leader Managers have strong political skills to cope with conflicting requirements of multiple constituents.
  5. Leader Managers don't accept the status quo
People don't want to be managed. They want to be lead.

During the coming months, we will be reviewing the following Maxwell leadership principles:
  • Influence
  • Priorities
  •  Integrity
  • Creating Positive Change
  • Problem-Solving
  • Attitude
  • People
  • Vision
  • Self-Discipline
  • Staff Development


Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Thursday, July 21, 2016

HOT HOT HOT



Folks,

It is going to be hot again this week. It seems repetitive to talk about the heat and heat-related illnesses, again. But, we must remember....

HEAT ILLNESS CAN BE DEADLY

The body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially with high humidity, sweating isn't enough. Body temperature can rise to dangerous levels if you don't drink enough water and rest in the shade. You can suffer from heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

In 2014 alone, 2,630 workers suffered from heat illness and 18 died from heat stroke and related causes on the job. Heat illnesses and deaths are preventable.

Under OSHA law, employers are responsible for providing workplaces free of known safety hazards. This includes protecting workers from extreme heat. An employer with workers exposed to high temperatures should establish a complete heat illness prevention program.
  • Provide workers with water, rest and shade.
  • Allow new or returning workers to gradually increase workloads and take more frequent breaks as they acclimatize, or build a tolerance for working in the heat.
  • Plan for emergencies and train workers on prevention.
  • Monitor workers for signs of illness:
    Heat Exhaustion
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Sweaty Skin
  • Weakness
  • Cramps
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Fast heart beat
         Heat Stroke
  • Red, hot, dry skin
  • High temperature
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Fainting
To prevent heat related illness and fatalities:
  • Drink water every 15 minutes, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Rest in the shade to cool down.
  • Wear a hat and light-colored clothing.
  • Learn the signs of heat illness and what to do in an emergency.
  • Keep an eye on fellow workers.
  • "Easy does it" on your first days of work in the heat. You need to get used to it.

Working in full sunlight can increase heat index values by 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep this in mind and plan additional precautions for working in these conditions.
Who is affected?
Any worker exposed to hot and humid conditions is at risk of heat illness, especially those doing heavy work tasks or using bulky protective clothing and equipment. Some workers might be at greater risk than others if they have not built up a tolerance to hot conditions, including new workers, temporary workers, or those returning to work after a week or more off. All workers are at risk during a heat wave.
What to do if a worker becomes ill?
  • Call a supervisor for help. If a supervisor is not available, call 911.
  • Have someone stay with the worker until help arrives.
Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Monday, May 16, 2016

Whale Done! 9

Today, we conclude our little journey with Wes Kingsley in Ken Blanchard's book entitled Whale Done! It carries the subtitle "The Power of Positive Relationships." The message and the "to do" items meld nicely with our journey to culture excellence in safety, quality, ethics, production, in fact, with all we do.

Wes contacts the Consultant to compare notes. He shares with the Consultant all the positive changes he is witnessing around him due to following the few simple steps of the WHALE DONE Response.
\
Consultant: "As long as you're busy accentuating the positive with others, a little self-praise won't hurt. I come across a lot of managers who are hard on others because they're so hard on themselves. They're always after themselves in their heads. 'Oh, I should have done that better,' or, 'What a dummy I am, forgetting that detail.'  If you catch yourself doing things right, everything in your life will improve - especially your relationships. That's because it's fun to be around someone who, likes himself."
 
As a way to summarize this great book and the message it contains, I encourage you to review the following slides from the Consultant's presentation:
 
 
Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Whale Done! 8


Today, we will continue to learn with Wes Kingsley in Ken Blanchard's book entitled Whale Done! It carries the subtitle "The Power of Positive Relationships." The message and the "to do" items meld nicely with our journey to culture excellence in safety, quality, ethics, production, in fact, with all we do.

Our friend, Wes, is back at SeaWorld to talk with the Trainer about what he has learned so far. The Trainer doesn't waste any time, he picks up right where he left off the last time they spoke.

Trainer: "Rather than focusing on the negative - what they do wrong - we pay attention to what they do right. We always try to catch the whales doing things right ... Our success with the whales happens a little bit at a time. We can't wait until they behave exactly as we want before we praise them."
 
Wes: "Always praise progress. It's a moving target."
 
Trainer: "Not only does focusing on the positive motivate the behavior we want, it builds trust and the fun-loving kind of environment we need to work successfully with these animals ... Rewards aren't the issue. Trust is the issue."
 
Wes remembers earlier comments about ignoring poor behavior and redirecting energy onto something else that can set up a Positive Response. He wonders out loud how hard that is to do.
 
Trainer: "You're right. It is hard - not so much because people are so difficult, but because through practice we've trained our attention to notice only what they do wrong. We have our eye out for the negative behavior. We think it deserve much more attention. That's why we jump all over it and make a big deal out of it. Plus, those people that get labeled as difficult always have people around them looking for them to goof up. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy."
 
This type of behavior is really easy to do especially when you are having a tough day, or deadlines are approaching, or your boss just jumped all over you, Wes admits. The Trainer suggest that when you are having a tough day, that you ought to practice redirecting.
 
Trainer: "In fact, when you're first starting out, you'll actually find yourself redirecting a lot - in place of the negative responses you've been giving. In many cases, your first positive responses will follow right after redirecting. You observe their new efforts, and see how quickly you can accentuate the positive and catch them making progress in the new direction... When they didn't do something they were supposed to do, rather than spending a lot of time on that, we'd go back to the goals we'd agreed upon and get them refocused on them... Redirecting and giving 'approximately right' WHALE DONEs are the keys to turning poor behavior around... Humans naturally want approval from others. When you're dealing with your kids or with the people at work, and you consistently call attention to what they do right, it's like you're responding to the best that's in them. After a while, they begin to enjoy all the positive recognition. They find out it's more fun to succeed and achieve and be praised for it."
 
Wes is certainly glad he circled back to talk with the Trainer. It's all starting to come together for him. Next time, we'll see if Wes can piece it all together.
 
(I really like the following phrases spoken by the Trainer: "When you're dealing with your kids or with the people at work, and you consistently call attention to what they do right, it's like you're responding to the best that's in them." Wow, that's good stuff right there!)

Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Whale Done! 7

Today, we will continue to learn with Wes Kingsley in Ken Blanchard's book entitled Whale Done! It carries the subtitle "The Power of Positive Relationships." The message and the "to do" items meld nicely with our journey to culture excellence in safety, quality, ethics, production, in fact, with all we do.

In our last lesson, the Consultant had just concluded her presentation on the "Whale Done" philosophy. Wes and the Consultant meet for a cup of coffee. Wes is full of questions.

Wes: "But aren't you asked if the WHALE DONE Response isn't manipulation?..."
 
Consultant: "I'm very glad you brought that up. There are two points about manipulation. First of all, the only people who don't need to be motivated by others are entrepreneurs - people who either own their own businesses or are individuals working for themselves.  They are self-motivated and their goals are aligned with the organizational goals. In fact, their personal goals and the organizational goals are usually the same... Secondly; you don't want people to become dependent solely on your noticing and commenting, so they do well only when you're around. The point of good management is to influence people to do the right thing when you're not around... The ultimate goals of the WHALE DONE Response is to help people become self-motivating."
 
Wes: "You means, so that the WHALE DONEs are coming from inside themselves?"
 
Consultant: "After giving lots of WHALE DONEs, you start to make comments like 'I bet it felt good when you finished that project before the deadline' or 'You must be proud of what you did on that report.' Or when you know that they must be feeling good about their performance, you can say, 'Tell me how that feels,' or, 'What's it like, to have done such a good job?' Then really listen to them and reinforce their pride and feeling of accomplishment."
 
Wes and the Consultant begin talking about business and business models. Why some are successful and others aren't.
 
Consultant: "Any new business improvement today, whether it's a technology or a service innovation or a pricing strategy, becomes instantly known and copied by the competition. That means that your only real competitive edge is your relationship with your people. If they trust and respect you and believe in your goals, they will want to please your customers. When that happens, provided you've got other factors like product quality, pricing, and marketing, and delivery in place, no one can beat you. The one thing your competition can never steal from you is the relationship you have with your people, and the relationship they have with your customers."
 
(Interesting! I sure thought the Consultant was going to say the only real competitive edge is your people! However, she said your relationship with your people.  That goes back to lesson #1 - trust and time.)
 
Wes leaves the coffee shop with a briefcase full of notes and a head boiling over with ideas.
 
Next time, Wes returns to SeaWorld to continue his learning with the Trainer.

 
Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Monday, May 2, 2016

Whale Done! 6

Today, we will continue to learn with Wes Kingsley in Ken Blanchard's book entitled Whale Done! It carries the subtitle "The Power of Positive Relationships." The message and the "to do" items meld nicely with our journey to culture excellence in safety, quality, ethics, production, in fact, with all we do.The Consultant is about to bring her lecture to the large group, including our friend West Kingsley, to an end; however, she still has a couple of points to share ... specifically regarding unacceptable behavior.

Consultant: "People ask me, 'What about unacceptable behaviors or poor performance on the job? How do you deal with those?' I usually recommend the Redirection Response. But if someone knows better and they continue with the unacceptable behavior, that's an attitude problem. A Redirection Response will have little effect because they already know what to do. They need to know in no uncertain terms that what they are doing is unacceptable to you. But remember, a Negative Response is a last resort. You tell people, immediately and specifically, what they did that was unacceptable - including the negative impact of their action and how you feel about it: disappointed, confused, frustrated. But since you don't want the focus to be on your feelings, always end that kind of message with an affirmation of the person. They need to know that it's the behavior, not them, that you find unacceptable."
 
The Consultant is describing the "how to" for some "tough love." (I've often heard the phrase - be hard on the process and easy on the people. I wonder if that applies here?) The Consultant continues with her recommendations ...
 
Consultant: "You should also remember that whenever you criticize someone's performance or give negative feedback, no matter how carefully you do it, it tends to harm or detract from your relationship with that person. If you keep it up, you will poison the relationship. They'll lose trust and start trying to get even with you. This is where it helps to think of a relationship as being like a bank account. If you give a Negative Response to someone who knows better, it helps if you have money in that relationship bank - that is, if you've previously been giving that person lots of WHALE DONEs. Then he or she won't mind the correction. When the trust is there, a mistake can even lead to better performance. WHALE DONE - accentuating the positive - always creates a constructive cycle."
 
And, with that, the Consultant concludes her presentation. Next time, Wes meets with the Consultant to further his understanding (and ours) of the WHALE DONE Response.
 
In the meantime, below is a quick reminder of the WHALE DONE Response.


Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Whale Done! 5

Today, we will continue to learn with Wes Kingsley in Ken Blanchard's book entitled Whale Done! It carries the subtitle "The Power of Positive Relationships." The message and the "to do" items meld nicely with our journey to culture excellence in safety, quality, ethics, production, in fact, with all we do.

Last time, our friend Wes Kingsley, along with a large room full of people, was vigorously taking notes as the Consultant explained about the four kinds of consequences in response to a specific behavior - No Response; Negative Response; Redirection; and Positive Response. The presentation continues ...

Consultant: "Catching people doing things wrong is easy. All you have to do is wait for them to foul up. Then you can look smart by pointing out their mistakes. I call that the GOTcha Response. Nothing to it. In fact, many bosses, as we've already suggested, are 'seagull' managers. They leave their people alone until they do something wrong. Then they swoop in, make a lot of noise, and dump on everybody. It's the old leave-alone-zap approach."  
 
There were so many heads nodding in agreement in the room that it looked like a "bobble-head" testing site. Was your head nodding, too? Maybe, just a little bit?
 
Consultant: "Catching people doing things right is what I've come to call - if you'll pardon the pun - the WHALE DONE Response. That response is much harder because it takes patience and self-control. Especially if you've been ignoring what people do right and have been using lots of GOTchas, you must learn to observe what they are doing in a whole new way. You may even have to deliberately look past the undesirable behaviors that used to grab all your attention. In other words, you have to change what you are looking for. Your search for something done well may require greater effort, but it has far greater payoffs in generating the kind of behavior you want from your people at work and from your kids at home."
 
A new slide appears on the screen at the front of the room reviewing the two responses the Consultant had named.
Consultant: "If you grew up being GOTcha'd a lot, maybe you've tended to perpetuate it with others. But if your goal as a manger is performance improvement, it's vitally important you start using the WHALE DONE Response. I think you can begin to see that a lot of us often do things exactly backwards. We focus our attention on poor performance rather than on good performance. In the process, we reinforce the very behavior we don't want!"
 
Another slide appears on the screen.
 

Consultant: "Attention is like sunshine to humans. What we give our attention to, grows. What we ignore, withers... Think about this. When do you generally pay attention to people? It's when they're doing things wrong, isn't it? And when do you pay little attention to them? When everything's okay. Wrong! Right then, when things are going well, we lose a great motivational opportunity. We go brain-dead, become inactive, and don't pay attention or communicate. But if you were to systematically give people positive, specific feedback after they did something right, do you think you would get more of that behavior, or less of it?"
 
The audience responds with a robust, "MORE."
 
Consultant: "Of course you would. That's why we need to wake up and do and say something positive and encouraging when people are exceeding expectations, or when they've corrected errors they've made ... When you accentuate the positive, you'll begin to pay attention to what you do or say after people perform. I guarantee their performance will improve, and so will your relationships. Just remember, you're always reinforcing something - even when you're doing nothing ... The more WHALE DONEs you do, the better."

So, have we learned all there is to the WHALE DONE Response? Does the Consultant have additional tips for us to catch people doing right? Find out next time!

Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc