Thursday, June 1, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - People : Part 1

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The more people you develop, the greater the extent of your vision.

This chapter of Maxwell's book will focus on the importance of developing people to share in and assist you with implementation of your vision as a leader.

Maxwell observes that there are three levels of people/work skills:


Level 1: The person who works better with people is a follower.

Level 2: The person who helps people work better is a manager.

Level 3: The person who develops better people to work is a leader.

    Principles for People Development

    Your success in developing others will depend on how well you accomplish each of the following:
    • Value of people.
      • This is an issue of your attitude.
    • Commitment to people.
      • This is an issue of your time.
    • Integrity with people.
      • This is an issue of your character.
    • Standard for people.
      • This is an issue of your vision.
    • Influence over people.
      • This is an issue of your leadership.
    Successful people-developers:
    1. Make the right assumptions about people.
    2. Ask the right questions about people.
    3. Give the right assistance to people.
    Successful People Developers ... Make the Right Assumptions About People

    • Your assumptions about people are what allows you to continually motivate and develop them. In fact, a leader having the right assumptions about people is the key factor in their continual development.
    • Your assumptions about people largely determine how you treat them. Why? What you assume about people is what you look for. What you look for is what you find. What you find influences your response.
    Assumptions:
    • Everyone wants to feel worthwhile.
      • People want to feel important!
      • Always help people increase their own self-esteem.
      • Develop your skills in making other people feel important.
    • Everyone needs and responds to encouragement.
      • "If you treat people to a vision of themselves, if you apparently overrate them, you make them become what they are capable of becoming.." - Victor Frankl
      • We do it through encouragement and belief in the,. People tend to become what the most important people in their lives think they will become.
    • People "buy into" the leader before they "buy into" his or her leadership.
      • People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.
      • You've got to give loyalty down before you receive loyalty up.
      • If people do not believe in their leader, anything will hinder them from following. If people believe in their leader, nothing will stop them.
    • Most people do not know how to be successful.
      • Success is really the result of planning. It happens where preparation and opportunity meet.
      • Success is really a process. It is growth and development. It is achieving one thing and using that as a stepping stone to achieve something else. It is a journey.
      • Success is learning from failure. Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.
    What De-Motivates People?
    • Don't belittle anyone.
      • If you have to give criticism, remember that it takes nine positive comments to balance one negative correction.
    • Don't manipulate anyone.
      • Build people up through affirmation and recognition, and they'll be motivated and loyal.
    • Don't be insensitive.
      • Make people your priority.
      • Your interest in even insignificant matters will demonstrate your sensitivity.
    • Don't discourage personal growth.
      • Allow your staff to succeed and fail.
      • Build the team spirit approach that says, "if you grow, we all benefit."
    What Motivates People?
    • Significant contributions.
      • People must see value in what they are doing.
      • Motivation comes not by activity alone, but by the desire to reach the end result.
    • Goal participation.
      • When people have given input, they have a stake in the issue.
      • Goal participation builds team spirit, enhances moral, and helps everyone feel important.
    • Positive dissatisfaction.
      • Dissatisfied people are highly motivated people, for they see the need for immediate change.
      • The key is harnessing this energy toward effective change.
    • Recognition.
      • People want credit for personal achievements and appreciation for their contributions.
    • Clear expectations.
      • People are motivated when they know exactly what they are to do and have the confidence that they can do it successfully.
      • Motivation rises in a job when the goals, expectations, and responsibilities are clearly understood.
    Next time, we will explore the other two traits of Success People-Developers: Ask the right questions about people and Give the right assistance to people.


    Donald G Rosenbarger
    Senior Vice President
    Delta Companies Inc

    Tuesday, May 30, 2017

    Developing the Leader Within You - Attitude : Part 2

    We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

    Great leaders understand that the right attitude will set the right atmosphere, which enables the right responses from others.

    This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with attitude.


    This session we will discuss ways to change your attitude. 

    The following sections will help you to help yourself in changing your attitude.&


    Review

    • The Six Stages of Attitude Change
      1. Identify Problem Feelings
      2. Identify Problem Behavior
        • What triggers wrong feelings?
      3. Identify Problem Thinking
        • "That which holds our attention determines our action" - William James
      4. Identify Right Thinking
        • Because your feelings come from your thoughts, you can control your feelings by changing one thing - your thoughts!
      5. Make a Public Commitment to Right Thinking
        • Public commitment becomes powerful commitment.
      6. Develop a Plan for Right Thinking
        • A written definition of desired right thinking.
        • A way to measure progress.
        • A daily measuring of progress.
        • A person to whom you are accountable.
        • A daily diet of self-help materials.
        • Associating with right thinking people.
    Resolve
    • Whenever a leader needs to ask others to make a commitment of time, two questions must always be answered: "Can they?" (this deals with ability) and "Will they?" (this deals with attitude).
    • Two other questions usually answer the "Will they?" issue.
      1. The first is, "is the timing right?" In other words, are the conditions right to enable change?
      2. The second question is, "Is their temperature hot?" Are right conditions accompanied with a red-hot desire to pay the price necessary for needed change?
    • When both questions can be answered with a resounding Yes!, then the resolve is strong and success is possible.
    Reframe
    • Dennis Waitley says that the winners in life think constantly in terms of I can, I will, and I am.
    • Reframing your attitude means:
      • I may not be able to change the world I see around me,
      • But, I can change the way I see the world around me.
    Re-center
    • As you begin changing your thinking, start immediately to change your behavior. Begin to act the part of the person you would like to become.
    • Take action on the behavior you admire by making it your behavior.
    • As Harvard psychologist Jerome Bruner says, you're more like to act yourself into feeling that feel yourself into action. So act! whatever it is you know you should do, do it.
    Repeat
    • "Attitudes are nothing more than habits of thought. and can be acquired. An action repeated becomes an attitude realized." - Paul Meier
    • First:
      • Say the right words
      • Read the right books
      • Listen to the right tapes
      • Be with the right people
      • Do the right things
      • Pray the right prayer
    • Second:
      • Do the "first" actions every day, not just once or only when you feel like it, and watch your life change for the better.
    Renewal
    • Fortunately, over a period of time a positive attitude can replace a negative one.
    • The more that negative thoughts are weeded out and replaced by positive ones, the more personal renewals will be experienced.

    Donald G Rosenbarger
    Senior Vice President
    Delta Companies Inc


    Developing the Leader Within You - Attitude : Part 1

    We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

    Great leaders understand that the right attitude will set the right atmosphere, which enables the right responses from others.

    This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with attitude

    Just as our attitudes are the extra pluses in like, they also make the difference in leading others. Leadership has less to do with position than it does disposition. The disposition of a leader is important because it will influence the way followers think and feel.


    Our attitudes are Our Most Important Assets:

    • Our attitude may not be the asset that makes us great leaders, but without good ones we will never reach our full potential.
      • Our attitudes are the "and then some" that allows us the little extra edge over those whose thinking is wrong.
        • Our attitudes determine what we see and how we handle our feelings. Those two factors greatly determine our success.
          • What we see:
            • Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.
            • Our expectations have a great deal to do with our attitudes. And these expectations may be totally false, but they will determine our attitudes.
          • How we handle our feelings.
            • There is a great difference between how we feel and how we handle our feelings.
            • Everyone has times when they feel bad.
            • Our attitudes cannot stop our feelings, but they can keep our feelings from stopping us.
        It is Improbable that a Person with a Bad Attitude can Continuously be a Success.
        • We cannot continue to function in a manner that we do not truly believe about ourselves.
        • A leader's attitude is caught by his or her followers more quickly than his or her actions.
        We are Responsible for Our Attitudes.
        • "I have to keep working on my thought life. I am responsible to have a great attitude and to maintain it. My attitude does not run on automatic." - Melvin Maxwell
        • The greatest day in your life and mine is when we take total responsibility for our attitudes. That's the day we truly grow up.
        It's Not What Happens to Me that Matters BUT What Happens in Me.
        • "Every time you make a choice you are turning the control part of you, the part  that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, you are slowing turning this control thing either into a heavenly creature or into a hellish one." - C.S. Lewis
        The Leader's Attitude Helps Determine the Attitudes of the Followers.
        • Leadership is influence. People catch our attitudes just like they catch our colds - by getting close to us.
        • It is important to possess a great attitude, not only for your personal success, but also for the benefit of others.
        • Your responsibilities as a leader must always be viewed in light of the many, not just yourself.
        • A leader's attitude is caught by his follower more quickly than his actions. An attitude is reflected by others even when they don't follow the action. An attitude can be expressed without a word being spoken.
        Next time, we will learn how to change our attitude.

        Donald G Rosenbarger
        Senior Vice President
        Delta Companies Inc



        Thursday, April 6, 2017

        Developing the Leader Within You - Problem Solving : Part 3

        We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

        The size of the person is more important than the size of the problem.

        This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with the two things needed to effectively solve problems: the right attitude and the right action plan.


        The two previous installments discussed Maxwell's observations regarding problems and problem-solving. Today, we will explore The Problem Solving Process.
        The Problem Solving Process

        1. Identify the Problem.
          • Too many times we attack the symptoms, not the cause.
        2. Prioritize the Problem.
          • Whether you face three problems, thirty, or three hundred, "make them stand in single file so you face only one at a time."
          • Approach these problems, not with a view of finding what you hope will be there, but to get the truth and the realities that must be grappled with.
        3. Define the Problem. 
          • In a single sentence, answer the question, "What is the problem?"
          • Defining the problem in a single sentence is a four step-process:
            1. Ask the right questions.
              • Ask process-related questions.
              • Two words that always govern Maxwell's questions are trends and timing.
              • Most problem trails can be sniffed out if specific questions are asked in these two areas.
            2. Talk to the right people.
              • Beware of authorities with a "we-know-better" attitude.
              • These people have blind spots and are resistant to change.
              • Creativity is essential for problem-solving.
            3. Get the hard facts.
              • "Once the facts are clear, the decisions jump out at you." - Peter Drucker
              • Listen to what is not being said and gather the important data.
            4. Get involved in the process.
              • Get involved in the process by doing the actual jobs of the people concerned and see what problems arise.
              • Problems should be solved at the lowest level possible because that is where they appear. That is also the level where they are most clearly defined.
          • Select People to Help You in the Problem-Solving Process.
            • Before inviting people to attend a problem-solving meeting, ask these questions:
              1. Is it a real problem?
              2. Is it urgent?
              3. Is the true nature of the problem known?
              4. Is it specific?
              5. Has the group most competent to discuss the problem been invited and is each participant concerned about solving this issue?
          • Collect Problem Causes.
            • List all the possible causes of the problem by asking what caused the problem and how the problem can be avoided in the future.
          • Collect Problem-Solving Solutions.
            • List as many solutions to a problem as possible.
            • Options are essential because a problem continually shifts and changes.
          • Prioritize and Select the "Best" Solution.
            • Weigh all the possible solutions before deciding by asking the following questions:
              1. Which solution has the greatest potential to be right?
              2. Which solution is in the best interest of the organization?
              3. Which solution has momentum and timing on it's side?
              4. Which solution has the greatest chance for success?
          • Implement the Best Solution.
          • Evaluate the Solution.
            • Ask these questions to evaluate the responses:
              1. Were we able to identify the real causes of the problem?
              2. Did we make the right decision?
              3. Has the problem been resolved?
              4. Have the key people accepted this solution?
              5. Did I help people to develop problem-solving skills to manage conflict in the future?
          • Set Up Principles or Policies to Keep Problems from Recurring.
            • Whereas policies are set up for a particular function in a specific area, principles are guidelines for everyone and are more general. Policies change when their use is no longer essential. Principles do not change.
            • To teach principles effectively, you must:
              1. Model them.
              2. Relate them by answering the questions, "How can I use this in my life?"
              3. Applaud when you see the principles being applied in another's life.
          Wow! That's a lot of questions to have to ask ourselves and others to solve a problem. I guess a few more questions to ask is "How big is the problem?" and "How much do I want to solve it?" If it's big enough and you want to solve it bad enough, then Maxwell's recipe for problem-solving will help you get the job done.


          On another thought ... does this Problem-Solving Process remind you of the Rapid Improvement Workshop utilized by our Continuous Improvement Team in the Colas Goal Zero Process? Or, is it just me?

          Donald G Rosenbarger
          Senior Vice President
          Delta Companies Inc

          Developing the Leader Within You - Problem Solving : Part 2

          We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

          The size of the person is more important than the size of the problem.

          This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with the two things needed to effectively solve problems: the right attitude and the right action plan.

          Last time, we ended with five of Maxwell's observations regarding problem-solving. Today, we will review five more:

          • A test of a leader is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.
            • Under excellent leadership a problem seldom reaches gigantic proportions because it is recognized and fixed in its early stages.
            • Great leaders usually recognize a problem in the following sequence:
              1. They sense it before they see it (intuition).
              2. They begin looking for it and ask questions (curiosity).
              3. They gather data (processing).
              4. They share their feelings and findings to a few trusted colleagues (communicating).
              5. They define the problem (writing).
              6. They check their resources (evaluating).
              7. They make a good decision (leading).
            • Great leaders are seldom blind-sided.
          • You can judge leaders by the size of the problem they tackle.
            • The size of the person is more important than the size of the problem.
            • Problems look larger or smaller according to  whether the person is small or large.
            • Our focus as a leader should be to build big people. Big people will handle big issues effectively.
          • Solve task-problems quickly; people-problems will take longer.
            • Problems never stop but people can stop problems. 
            • Suggestions for producing "problem-solvers:"
              1. Make a commitment to people.
                • Those who never take time to develop people are forced to take time to solve their problems.
              2. Never solve a problem for a person; solve it with that person.
                • Take that individual through the sequence that has already been given for recognizing a problem.
            • Climbing the ladder of leadership means that fewer but more important decisions will be made.
            • The problem-solving skills of a leader must be sharpened because every decision becomes a major decision.
          • The right attitude.
            • Norman Vincent Peale was right when he said that positive thinking is how you think about a problem. Enthusiasm is how you feel about a problem. The two together determine what you do about a problem.
            • If I could so anything for people, I would help them change their perspectives, not their problems.
            • Positive thinking does not always change our circumstances, but it will always change us.
          • The right action plan
            • Some people assume that a defect-free system can be developed for their lives.
            • Some people assume that something will do wrong and they need a backup system.
            • Too many times when a problem arises, we want to blame someone else and take the easy way out.
            • So .....
          So, ... next time, we will learn about "The problem-Solving Process."

          Donald G Rosenbarger
          Senior Vice President
          Delta Companies Inc

          Monday, March 20, 2017

          Developing the Leader Within You - Problem Solving : Part 1

          We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

          The Quickest Way to Gain Leadership: Problem-Solving : Part 1

          The size of the person is more important than the size of the problem.

          This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with the two things needed to effectively solve problems: the right attitude and the right action plan.



          According to F.F. Fournies, there are four common reasons why people do not perform the way they should:
          1. They do not know what they are supposed to do.
          2. They do not know how to do it.
          3. They do not know why they should.
          4. There are obstacles beyond their control.

            These four reasons why people fail to perform at their potential are responsibilities of leadership. The first three reasons deal with starting a job correctly. A training program, job description, proper tools, and vision, along with good communication skills, will go a long way in effectively meeting the first three issues.

            The following are five characteristics from Maxwell's life:

            • We all have problems
               - We should remember the words of Paul Harvey who said that in times like these it is always helpful to remember that there have always been times like these.
            • Problems give meaning to life.
              - People need to change their perspectives, not their problems.
              - A life free of all obstacles and difficulties would reduce all possibilities and powers to zero.
              - Eliminate problems and life loses its creative tension.
            • Many outstanding people have overcome problems in their lives.
              - Policies are many; principles are few. Policies will change; principles never do.
              - Dolly Parton sums it all up with these words: "The way I see it, if you want the rainbow you gotta put up with the rain."
            • My problem is not my problem.
              - There is world of differences between a person who has a big problem and a person who makes a problem big.
              - Their "problems" are not their real problems. The problem is they react wrongly to "problems" and therefore make their "problems" real problems.
              - What really counts is not what happens to me but what happens in me.
              - Why do achievers overcome problems while thousands are overwhelmed by theirs? They refused to hold on to the common excuses for failure.
              - They turned their stumbling blocks into stepping stones. They realized they could not determine every circumstance in life but they could determine their choice of attitude in every circumstance.
            • A problem is something I can do something about
              - If I can't do something about a problem, it's not my problem, it's a fact of life.
              - Be careful in resigning yourself to the position that there is no answer to a problem. Someone else may come along with a solution.
            Next time, we will explore more of Maxwell's observations about problem-solving.

             Donald G Rosenbarger
            Senior Vice President
            Delta Companies Inc

            Monday, February 20, 2017

            Developing the Leader Within You - Creating Positive Change : Part 4

            We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

            The first order of things to be changed is me, the leader. After I consider how hard it is to change myself, then I will understand the challenge of trying to change others. This is the ultimate test of leadership.

            Last time we looked at ten strategies for creating a climate for change. Strategy #10 was "Give the People Ownership of the Change." We will explore methods of doing that in this lesson as we wrap up this chapter.


            How to Offer Ownership of Change to Others
            1. Inform people in advance so they'll have time to think about the implications of the change and how it will affect them.
            2. Explain the overall objective of the change - the reasons for it and how and when it will occur.
            3. Show people how the change will benefit them. Be honest with the employees who may lose out as a result of the change. Alert them early and provide assistance to help them find another job, if necessary.
            4. Ask those who will be affected by the change to participate in all stages of the change process.
            5. Keep communication channels open. Provide opportunities for employees to discuss the change. Encourage questions, comments, and other feedback.
            6. Be flexible and adaptable throughout the change process. Admit mistakes and make changes where appropriate.
            7. Constantly demonstrate your belief in and commitment to the change. Indicate your confidence in their ability to implement the change.
            8. Provide enthusiasm, assistance, appreciation, and recognition to those implementing the change.
            Change will happen. The question should not be "Will we ever change?" but "When and how much will we change?"

            Not all change is improvement, but without change there can be no improvement.

            "In the end, it is important to remember that we cannot become what we need to be by remaining what you are." - Max Dupree

            It's a fact that when you're through changing, you're through!

            It is never too late to change.

            Make a choice today to change. And when change is successful, you will look back at it and call it growth.

            Donald G Rosenbarger
            Senior Vice President
            Delta Companies Inc