Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - Vision : Part 1

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

All great leaders possess two things: They know where they are going, and, They are able to persuade others to follow.


This chapter of Maxwell's book discusses the power of a strong clear vision.

Vision Statements

People do what people see.

In other words, people depend on visual stimulation for growth. Couple a vision with a leader willing to implement that dream and a movement begins. People do not follow a dream in itself. They follow the leader who has that dream and the ability to communicate it effectively.

Four Vision-Levels of People.

  1. Some people never see it. (They are wanderers.)
  2. Some people see it but never pursue it on their own. (They are followers.)
  3. Some people see it and pursue it. (They are achievers.)
  4. Some people see it and pursue it and help others see it. (They are leaders.)
You See What You Are Prepared To See.

Leaders can never take their people farther than they have traveled. Like leader, like people.

We see what we are prepared to see, not what is. Every successful leader understands this about people and ask three questions:
  • What do others see?
  • Why do they see it that way?
  • How can I change their perception?


What You See Is What You Get.

Bobbi Biehl, in his book Increasing Your Leadership Confidence, says, "Keep in mind the difference between a winner's and a loser's mentality. Winners focus on winning big - not just how to win, but how to win big. Losers, however, don't focus on losing; they just focus on getting by!"

Keep asking yourself, "Survival, success, or significance?" are you striving to simply survive, are you dreaming about success, or are you really out to make a truly significant difference?

Next time, we will explore the two kinds of "ownership" of a vision.



Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Monday, August 14, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - People : Part 3

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The more people you develop, the greater the extent of your vision.

This chapter of Maxwell's book  will focus on the importance of developing people to share in and assist you with implementation of your vision as a leader.

In the last two lessors, we discussed the three traits of Successful People Developers. In this lessor, we will discuss People Development Principles.



People Development Principles
  1. People development takes time.
    • "There is something that is much more scarce, something raver than ability. It is the ability to recognize ability." - Robert Half
  2. People skills are essential for success.
    • The center for Creative Leadership studied successful executives and found the following
      1. They admitted their mistakes and accepted the consequences, rather than trying to blame others.
      2. They were able to get along with a wide variety of people.
      3. They had strong interpersonal skills, sensitivity to others, and tact.
      4. They were calm and confident, rather than moody and volatile.
    • "The most important single ingredient to the formula of success is knowing how to get along with people." - Teddy Roosevelt
  3. Be a model that others can follow.
    • The number one motivational principle in the world is: People do what people see.
    • The speed of the leader determines the speed of the followers.
    • People's mind are changed more through observation than through arguments.
  4. Lead others by looking through their eyes.
    • "We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing; while others judge us by what we have already done." - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  5. Leaders must care for people before they can develop them.
    • Too often leaders request commitment from people without showing them proper care.
    • High achievers view subordinates optimistically, while low achievers showed a basic distrust of subordinates' abilities.
    • High achievers seek advice from their subordinates; low achievers don't.
    • High achievers are listeners; moderate achievers listen only to superiors; low achievers avoid communication and rely on policy manuals.
  6. People developers look for opportunities to build up people.
    • The following are actions that good leaders avoid:
      1. Failure to give credit for suggestions.
      2. Failure to correct grievances.
      3. Failure to encourage.
      4. Criticizing employees in front of other people.
      5. Failure to ask employees their opinion.
      6. Failure to ask employees of their progress.
      7. Favoritism.
  7. The greatest potential for growth of a company is growth of its people.
    • According to William J.H. Boetcker, people divide themselves into four classes:
      1. Those who always do less than they are told.
      2. Those who will do what they are told, but no more.
      3. Those who will do things without being told.
      4. Those who will inspire others to do things.
    • "Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
Next time, we will look into the indispensable quality of leadership - VISION.


Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Developing the Leader Within You - People : Part 2

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The more people you develop, the greater the extent of your vision.


This chapter of Maxwell's book will focus on the importance of developing people to share in and assist you with implementation of your vision as a leader. 

Last time we discussed the first trait of Successful People Developers ... Make the Right Assumptions About People. In this lesson, we will discuss the remaining two traits.



Successful People Developers ... Ask the Right Questions About People
  • Am I building people or am I building my dream and using people to do it?
    • Manipulation is moving together for my advantage.
    • Motivation is moving together for mutual advantage.
  • Do I care enough to confront people when it will make a difference?
    • Clarify the issue instead of confronting the person.
    • The Ten Commandments of Confrontation:
      1. Do it privately, not publicly.
      2. Do it as soon as possible.
      3. Speak to one issue at a time.
      4. Once you've made a appoint don't keep repeating it.
      5. Deal only with actions the person can change.
      6. Avoid sarcasm.
      7. Avoid works like always and never.
      8. Present criticisms as suggestions or questions if possible.
      9. Don't apologize for the confrontational meeting.
      10. Don't forget the compliments.
  • Am I listening to people with more than my ears; am I hearing more than words?
    • What most people really want is to be listened to, respected, and understood.
    • The moment people see that they are being understood, they become more motivated to understand your point of view.
  • What are the major strengths of this individual?
    • Anyone who continually has to work in areas of personal weakness instead of personal strength will not stay motivated.
  • Have I placed a high priority on the job?
    • People tend to stay motivated when they see the importance of the things they are asked to do.
    • The five most encouraging words in an organization are: "It will make a difference."
  • Have I shown the value the person will receive from this relationship?
    • People tend to stay motivated when they see the value to them of the things they are asked to do.
    • "What's in it for me?"
Successful People Developers ... Give the Right Assistance to People

  • I need to work out their strengths and work on their weaknesses.
    • Some of the most capable people in an organization never utilize their greatest strengths. But they may never get an opportunity to do what they can do best. When this happens, everybody loses.
  • I must give them myself.
    • You can impress people at a distance but you can only impact them up close.
    • Encourage the many; mentor the few.
    • Be transparent with them.
    • Develop a plan for their growth.
    • Become a team.
  • I must give them ownership.
    • People want to be appreciated, not impressed.
  • I must give them every chance for success.
    • An excellent atmosphere to work in.
    • The right tools to work with.
    • A continual training program to work under.
    • Excellent people to work for. Develop a team.
    • A compelling vision to work toward.
Next time, we will explore the remaining levels of leadership.

Donald G Rosenbarger
Senior Vice President
Delta Companies Inc

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Developing the Leader Within You - People : Part 1

We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

The more people you develop, the greater the extent of your vision.

This chapter of Maxwell's book will focus on the importance of developing people to share in and assist you with implementation of your vision as a leader.

Maxwell observes that there are three levels of people/work skills:


Level 1: The person who works better with people is a follower.

Level 2: The person who helps people work better is a manager.

Level 3: The person who develops better people to work is a leader.

    Principles for People Development

    Your success in developing others will depend on how well you accomplish each of the following:
    • Value of people.
      • This is an issue of your attitude.
    • Commitment to people.
      • This is an issue of your time.
    • Integrity with people.
      • This is an issue of your character.
    • Standard for people.
      • This is an issue of your vision.
    • Influence over people.
      • This is an issue of your leadership.
    Successful people-developers:
    1. Make the right assumptions about people.
    2. Ask the right questions about people.
    3. Give the right assistance to people.
    Successful People Developers ... Make the Right Assumptions About People

    • Your assumptions about people are what allows you to continually motivate and develop them. In fact, a leader having the right assumptions about people is the key factor in their continual development.
    • Your assumptions about people largely determine how you treat them. Why? What you assume about people is what you look for. What you look for is what you find. What you find influences your response.
    Assumptions:
    • Everyone wants to feel worthwhile.
      • People want to feel important!
      • Always help people increase their own self-esteem.
      • Develop your skills in making other people feel important.
    • Everyone needs and responds to encouragement.
      • "If you treat people to a vision of themselves, if you apparently overrate them, you make them become what they are capable of becoming.." - Victor Frankl
      • We do it through encouragement and belief in the,. People tend to become what the most important people in their lives think they will become.
    • People "buy into" the leader before they "buy into" his or her leadership.
      • People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.
      • You've got to give loyalty down before you receive loyalty up.
      • If people do not believe in their leader, anything will hinder them from following. If people believe in their leader, nothing will stop them.
    • Most people do not know how to be successful.
      • Success is really the result of planning. It happens where preparation and opportunity meet.
      • Success is really a process. It is growth and development. It is achieving one thing and using that as a stepping stone to achieve something else. It is a journey.
      • Success is learning from failure. Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently.
    What De-Motivates People?
    • Don't belittle anyone.
      • If you have to give criticism, remember that it takes nine positive comments to balance one negative correction.
    • Don't manipulate anyone.
      • Build people up through affirmation and recognition, and they'll be motivated and loyal.
    • Don't be insensitive.
      • Make people your priority.
      • Your interest in even insignificant matters will demonstrate your sensitivity.
    • Don't discourage personal growth.
      • Allow your staff to succeed and fail.
      • Build the team spirit approach that says, "if you grow, we all benefit."
    What Motivates People?
    • Significant contributions.
      • People must see value in what they are doing.
      • Motivation comes not by activity alone, but by the desire to reach the end result.
    • Goal participation.
      • When people have given input, they have a stake in the issue.
      • Goal participation builds team spirit, enhances moral, and helps everyone feel important.
    • Positive dissatisfaction.
      • Dissatisfied people are highly motivated people, for they see the need for immediate change.
      • The key is harnessing this energy toward effective change.
    • Recognition.
      • People want credit for personal achievements and appreciation for their contributions.
    • Clear expectations.
      • People are motivated when they know exactly what they are to do and have the confidence that they can do it successfully.
      • Motivation rises in a job when the goals, expectations, and responsibilities are clearly understood.
    Next time, we will explore the other two traits of Success People-Developers: Ask the right questions about people and Give the right assistance to people.


    Donald G Rosenbarger
    Senior Vice President
    Delta Companies Inc

    Tuesday, May 30, 2017

    Developing the Leader Within You - Attitude : Part 2

    We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

    Great leaders understand that the right attitude will set the right atmosphere, which enables the right responses from others.

    This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with attitude.


    This session we will discuss ways to change your attitude. 

    The following sections will help you to help yourself in changing your attitude.&


    Review

    • The Six Stages of Attitude Change
      1. Identify Problem Feelings
      2. Identify Problem Behavior
        • What triggers wrong feelings?
      3. Identify Problem Thinking
        • "That which holds our attention determines our action" - William James
      4. Identify Right Thinking
        • Because your feelings come from your thoughts, you can control your feelings by changing one thing - your thoughts!
      5. Make a Public Commitment to Right Thinking
        • Public commitment becomes powerful commitment.
      6. Develop a Plan for Right Thinking
        • A written definition of desired right thinking.
        • A way to measure progress.
        • A daily measuring of progress.
        • A person to whom you are accountable.
        • A daily diet of self-help materials.
        • Associating with right thinking people.
    Resolve
    • Whenever a leader needs to ask others to make a commitment of time, two questions must always be answered: "Can they?" (this deals with ability) and "Will they?" (this deals with attitude).
    • Two other questions usually answer the "Will they?" issue.
      1. The first is, "is the timing right?" In other words, are the conditions right to enable change?
      2. The second question is, "Is their temperature hot?" Are right conditions accompanied with a red-hot desire to pay the price necessary for needed change?
    • When both questions can be answered with a resounding Yes!, then the resolve is strong and success is possible.
    Reframe
    • Dennis Waitley says that the winners in life think constantly in terms of I can, I will, and I am.
    • Reframing your attitude means:
      • I may not be able to change the world I see around me,
      • But, I can change the way I see the world around me.
    Re-center
    • As you begin changing your thinking, start immediately to change your behavior. Begin to act the part of the person you would like to become.
    • Take action on the behavior you admire by making it your behavior.
    • As Harvard psychologist Jerome Bruner says, you're more like to act yourself into feeling that feel yourself into action. So act! whatever it is you know you should do, do it.
    Repeat
    • "Attitudes are nothing more than habits of thought. and can be acquired. An action repeated becomes an attitude realized." - Paul Meier
    • First:
      • Say the right words
      • Read the right books
      • Listen to the right tapes
      • Be with the right people
      • Do the right things
      • Pray the right prayer
    • Second:
      • Do the "first" actions every day, not just once or only when you feel like it, and watch your life change for the better.
    Renewal
    • Fortunately, over a period of time a positive attitude can replace a negative one.
    • The more that negative thoughts are weeded out and replaced by positive ones, the more personal renewals will be experienced.

    Donald G Rosenbarger
    Senior Vice President
    Delta Companies Inc


    Developing the Leader Within You - Attitude : Part 1

    We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

    Great leaders understand that the right attitude will set the right atmosphere, which enables the right responses from others.

    This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with attitude

    Just as our attitudes are the extra pluses in like, they also make the difference in leading others. Leadership has less to do with position than it does disposition. The disposition of a leader is important because it will influence the way followers think and feel.


    Our attitudes are Our Most Important Assets:

    • Our attitude may not be the asset that makes us great leaders, but without good ones we will never reach our full potential.
      • Our attitudes are the "and then some" that allows us the little extra edge over those whose thinking is wrong.
        • Our attitudes determine what we see and how we handle our feelings. Those two factors greatly determine our success.
          • What we see:
            • Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.
            • Our expectations have a great deal to do with our attitudes. And these expectations may be totally false, but they will determine our attitudes.
          • How we handle our feelings.
            • There is a great difference between how we feel and how we handle our feelings.
            • Everyone has times when they feel bad.
            • Our attitudes cannot stop our feelings, but they can keep our feelings from stopping us.
        It is Improbable that a Person with a Bad Attitude can Continuously be a Success.
        • We cannot continue to function in a manner that we do not truly believe about ourselves.
        • A leader's attitude is caught by his or her followers more quickly than his or her actions.
        We are Responsible for Our Attitudes.
        • "I have to keep working on my thought life. I am responsible to have a great attitude and to maintain it. My attitude does not run on automatic." - Melvin Maxwell
        • The greatest day in your life and mine is when we take total responsibility for our attitudes. That's the day we truly grow up.
        It's Not What Happens to Me that Matters BUT What Happens in Me.
        • "Every time you make a choice you are turning the control part of you, the part  that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, you are slowing turning this control thing either into a heavenly creature or into a hellish one." - C.S. Lewis
        The Leader's Attitude Helps Determine the Attitudes of the Followers.
        • Leadership is influence. People catch our attitudes just like they catch our colds - by getting close to us.
        • It is important to possess a great attitude, not only for your personal success, but also for the benefit of others.
        • Your responsibilities as a leader must always be viewed in light of the many, not just yourself.
        • A leader's attitude is caught by his follower more quickly than his actions. An attitude is reflected by others even when they don't follow the action. An attitude can be expressed without a word being spoken.
        Next time, we will learn how to change our attitude.

        Donald G Rosenbarger
        Senior Vice President
        Delta Companies Inc



        Thursday, April 6, 2017

        Developing the Leader Within You - Problem Solving : Part 3

        We will continue our leadership journey, learning new skills and refreshing old ones, with John C. Maxwell's book Developing the Leader Within You.

        The size of the person is more important than the size of the problem.

        This chapter of Maxwell's book deals with the two things needed to effectively solve problems: the right attitude and the right action plan.


        The two previous installments discussed Maxwell's observations regarding problems and problem-solving. Today, we will explore The Problem Solving Process.
        The Problem Solving Process

        1. Identify the Problem.
          • Too many times we attack the symptoms, not the cause.
        2. Prioritize the Problem.
          • Whether you face three problems, thirty, or three hundred, "make them stand in single file so you face only one at a time."
          • Approach these problems, not with a view of finding what you hope will be there, but to get the truth and the realities that must be grappled with.
        3. Define the Problem. 
          • In a single sentence, answer the question, "What is the problem?"
          • Defining the problem in a single sentence is a four step-process:
            1. Ask the right questions.
              • Ask process-related questions.
              • Two words that always govern Maxwell's questions are trends and timing.
              • Most problem trails can be sniffed out if specific questions are asked in these two areas.
            2. Talk to the right people.
              • Beware of authorities with a "we-know-better" attitude.
              • These people have blind spots and are resistant to change.
              • Creativity is essential for problem-solving.
            3. Get the hard facts.
              • "Once the facts are clear, the decisions jump out at you." - Peter Drucker
              • Listen to what is not being said and gather the important data.
            4. Get involved in the process.
              • Get involved in the process by doing the actual jobs of the people concerned and see what problems arise.
              • Problems should be solved at the lowest level possible because that is where they appear. That is also the level where they are most clearly defined.
          • Select People to Help You in the Problem-Solving Process.
            • Before inviting people to attend a problem-solving meeting, ask these questions:
              1. Is it a real problem?
              2. Is it urgent?
              3. Is the true nature of the problem known?
              4. Is it specific?
              5. Has the group most competent to discuss the problem been invited and is each participant concerned about solving this issue?
          • Collect Problem Causes.
            • List all the possible causes of the problem by asking what caused the problem and how the problem can be avoided in the future.
          • Collect Problem-Solving Solutions.
            • List as many solutions to a problem as possible.
            • Options are essential because a problem continually shifts and changes.
          • Prioritize and Select the "Best" Solution.
            • Weigh all the possible solutions before deciding by asking the following questions:
              1. Which solution has the greatest potential to be right?
              2. Which solution is in the best interest of the organization?
              3. Which solution has momentum and timing on it's side?
              4. Which solution has the greatest chance for success?
          • Implement the Best Solution.
          • Evaluate the Solution.
            • Ask these questions to evaluate the responses:
              1. Were we able to identify the real causes of the problem?
              2. Did we make the right decision?
              3. Has the problem been resolved?
              4. Have the key people accepted this solution?
              5. Did I help people to develop problem-solving skills to manage conflict in the future?
          • Set Up Principles or Policies to Keep Problems from Recurring.
            • Whereas policies are set up for a particular function in a specific area, principles are guidelines for everyone and are more general. Policies change when their use is no longer essential. Principles do not change.
            • To teach principles effectively, you must:
              1. Model them.
              2. Relate them by answering the questions, "How can I use this in my life?"
              3. Applaud when you see the principles being applied in another's life.
          Wow! That's a lot of questions to have to ask ourselves and others to solve a problem. I guess a few more questions to ask is "How big is the problem?" and "How much do I want to solve it?" If it's big enough and you want to solve it bad enough, then Maxwell's recipe for problem-solving will help you get the job done.


          On another thought ... does this Problem-Solving Process remind you of the Rapid Improvement Workshop utilized by our Continuous Improvement Team in the Colas Goal Zero Process? Or, is it just me?

          Donald G Rosenbarger
          Senior Vice President
          Delta Companies Inc